Food, drink, film and other random thoughts from The Lone Star State.

Saturday, December 15, 2007

Shakshuka



I loved this peasant breakfast dish in Israel. I've made it at home a couple of times and found I like the sauce part on pasta too.


  • 2 T Olive Oil
  • 1 Red Onion, Chopped
  • 6 Garlic Cloves, Chopped
  • 2 Jalapeños, Seeded and Minced
  • 2 Red Bell Peppers, Chopped
  • 1 Green Bell Pepper, Chopped
  • 8 Plum Tomatoes, Chopped
  • 4 14.5 Ounce Cans, Whole Italian Plum Tomatoes
  • 1/2 t Hot Paprika or Chipotle
  • 2 t Sweet Paprika
  • 1 t Smoked Paprika
  • 1 t Tumeric
  • 1 t Salt
  • 1 t Pepper, Freshly Ground
  • 2 t Sugar
  • 1 C Tomato Sauce
  • 1/2 C Vegetable or Chicken Stock
  • 5 Large Eggs
  • Pita Bread
  • Za'atar (follows)

Heat oil over medium high heat then add onion and saute until browned.

Add garlic, bell pepper, jalapeños and saute for 2 minutes.

Add fresh and canned tomatoes, reduce heat to low and cook for 5 minutes.

Add paprikas, tumeric, salt, sugar and pepper. Stir and cook for 5 minutes to blend.

Add tomtato juice and stock and bring to a full boil. Reduce to low and simmer until little moisture is left, about 1 hour.

With a large spoon make 5 indentations in the mixture. Crack the eggs into the indentations, cover and cook for 8 minutes or until eggs are set but yolk are not hard.

Spoon mixture and one egg each into bowls and serve with pita.

Za'atar is equal amounts of ground sumac, oregano, marjoram, toasted sesame seeds and olive oil. This gets sprinkled over the top.

Labels: ,

20 Comments:

Blogger Michael said...

Yup, Israelis definitely know how to do breakfast, that's for sure.

Too bad you can't find a decent steak or burger in this country, and the ice cream is mostly air.

Ah well, you can't win 'em all!

1:20 PM

 
Blogger Jim said...

Ah, but the Shawarma is good! :)

9:16 PM

 
Anonymous jasontt.com said...

Wow, this is what they eat for breakfast? Looks like it would be a great appetizer for a party. I may just have to whip this one up.

8:32 AM

 
Blogger Michael said...

Jim:
Yup, the shwarma is good, but don't buy it before 11am. It needs to cook for a while.

Jason:
It's a traditional kibbutz/farming breakfast, and a lot of people do eat it as a family breakfast on weekends and holidays. It's a popular dish.

It's not really an everyday mean anymore, though. There's a lot fo typically Israeli things which started fading away in the 70s and 80s, when the country's population began to boom, and move towards the cities, and Israel as a whole became more Americanized.

3:03 AM

 
Blogger carl r said...

That sounds really good. I think I'll have to try it some time.

3:04 AM

 
Blogger Jim said...

Jason, if you do make it save a little of the tomato mixture and try it on pasta, yum! I also serve the sauce with pita as an app.

6:21 AM

 
Blogger Jim said...

Michael, thats really interesting about the Americanization of Israel. I saw a lot of that while I was there. In fact I had to hunt for places to try Shakshuka. Outside of Dr. Shakshuka in Tel Aviv, I didn't notice it on many menus.

6:23 AM

 
Blogger Jim said...

Enjoy Carl! I've kind of made it a staple now, I even keep a little of the tomato mixture in the freezer for emergencies :)

6:25 AM

 
Blogger Michael said...

Jim:
I think that shakshuka is more a personal thing. There are probably as many varieties of it as there are cooks in Israel.

I haven't seen it on menus either, but who wants to go out to eat what they always have at home?

My wife makes really good shakshuka, by the way. She taught herself how while we were still in the States.

Carl:
Make it yourself, experiment until you like it, and you'll have something genuinely Israeli. If that means anything to you.

12:50 PM

 
Blogger Jim said...

I believe that Michael, its kind of like BBQ in Texas, everyone has their own version (which is naturally better than everyone else's). Come to think of it, I dont know too many Texans who go out for BBQ, they just make it at home.

6:15 PM

 
Blogger john said...

I like anything you can eat with pita bread.

1:20 AM

 
Blogger Jim said...

And pita is completely acceptable at breakfast, so I learned, John :)

6:24 AM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Michael, You don’t like the ice cream? When was the last time you had Glida Beer-Sheva? I also like the creamy Italian Aldo. We had Ice cream in Jerusalem and I didn’t hear any complaints. Of course it wasn’t Glida Beer-Sheva…..
Shakshuka is also served in any cafeteria, at work, and in the army, so I don’t think an Israeli would order it when eating out, too ordinary and too many bad memories. Also, some get heartburn. Shakshukah is usually not served for breakfast; it is usually served for supper. The main (meat meal) is lunch, and supper would be a light milk meal. Please remember the separation of milk and meat and you got it.
Marnina (Beer-Sheva)

11:06 AM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

One more thing:
Who cuts up Pita ?! Pita is like an envelope; you are supposed to put the shakshukah in it. Or rip off a piece and wipe (lnagev) the humus. Basic table manners !!
Marnina

11:15 AM

 
Blogger Jim said...

Hi cousin!

I still like the Shakshuka at breakfast, whether or not it was intended that way.

Oh, I tried the Shakshuka in a pita, what a mess, I now eat it like I would hummous. (Funny, the pita I buy comes perforated in 6 pieces like a pie, it falls apart into triangles :)

12:50 PM

 
Blogger Brian said...

ooo, I am totally going to make this. Thanks for the recipe.

8:19 AM

 
Blogger Jim said...

Enjoy Brian!

5:31 PM

 
Blogger Michael said...

Marnina:
Nope, I don't like Israeli ice cream. I keep comparing it to Cold Stone, Kilwins, and the Penn State Dairy. Glida is one of the few areas in which Israel doesn't measure up. Ah well, no one ever said aliyah would be easy.

In our house, shakshuka is served whenever we feel like making it. Friday breakfast is good, because we're all home, or dinner when we don't feel like putting much effort into cooking.

Only barbarians cut up the pita!

6:24 AM

 
Blogger Michael said...

Marnina:
Nope, I don't like Israeli ice cream. I keep comparing it to Cold Stone, Kilwins, and the Penn State Dairy. Glida is one of the few areas in which Israel doesn't measure up. Ah well, no one ever said aliyah would be easy.

In our house, shakshuka is served whenever we feel like making it. Friday breakfast is good, because we're all home, or dinner when we don't feel like putting much effort into cooking.

Only barbarians cut up the pita!

6:24 AM

 
Blogger Jim said...

I'm still going to cut up the pita :)

9:54 PM

 

Post a Comment

<< Home